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Keren: 052-339-3384

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Beyond Agile Israel
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#BydAgIsr20

After a lot of thought, we built up a team of professional speakers from all over the world, as well as from Yokneham, that will aim to introduce what lays behind the theme of Patterns & Anti Patterns in an Agile Implementation

Managing Principal, Innolution,
LLCAuthor of Essential ScrumCreator of the Visual AGILExicon®
Phone: (303) 827-3333

https://innolution.com/
 

Over the past 10 years Ken has been assisting companies with their larger-scale agile journeys. In several of these companies he has been engaged for multiple years on large (1000+ people) agile efforts. During this presentation he will communicate strategies and actual approaches that have been applied to the real issues he has encountered. The goal of this presentation is to communicate actual lessons learned, not theory.

About Ken Rubin

Addressing the Significant Issues that Impede Full End-To-End Business Agility

To achieve significant business results from adopting agile, organizations must focus on full end-to-end business agility. Such a focus involves the entire value chain of how the organization operates including budgeting, planning, legal, controls, HR, marketing, sales, etc. Most large-scale agile adoptions have historically focused on some or all of the development/IT departments within an organization. Although there are certainly benefits to be gained by embracing agility in the development areas, this approach is myopic and misses the bigger picture that development must occur within a larger system context. What is needed is end-to-end business agility where the whole system is considered and decisions and optimizations happen at the whole system level, of which development is but one piece.

When taking a full end-to-end perspective, we can expose many significant issues that impede an organization’s large-scale agile journey. For example, most organizations will not become fully end-to-end agile immediately, which means they will need to operate in a hybrid world of both agile and non-agile. Also, most organizations have historically used “projects” as their unit of focus for budgeting, planning, and team organization. Projects are a very poor unit of focus; fortunately there are specific characteristics we can leverage to make a better choice. And, dependencies among collaborating teams has made it nearly impossible for many organizations to reliably and predictably get the work done. There are multiple patterns for dealing with inter-team dependencies that need to be woven together into a holistic end-to-end solution. Finally, we need practical ways of using metrics in the context of a full end-to-end business agility environment that provide actionable information at multiple levels.

 

Vice President, Chief Scientist of Disciplined Agile
Scott.Ambler@pmi.org | +1 (416) 931-1701 

disciplined-agile.com


Scott is the Vice President, Chief Scientist of Disciplined Agile at Project Management Institute. Scott leads the evolution of the Disciplined Agile (DA) toolkit. Scott is the (co)-creator of the Disciplined Agile (DA) toolkit as well as the Agile Modeling (AM) and Agile Data (AD) methodologies. He is the (co-)author of several books, including Choose Your WoW!, An Executive’s Guide to Disciplined Agile, Refactoring Databases, Agile Modeling, Agile Database Techniques, and The Object Primer 3rd Edition. Scott blogs regularly at DisciplinedAgileDelivery.com and he can be contacted via pmi.org.

Scott Ambler

Beyond Failing Fast: Guided Continuous Improvement

Failing fast is certainly better than failing slowly, but it’s still failing. When someone advises you to fail fast what they’re really saying is that they don’t know if something is likely to work in the situation that you face so let’s do as little as possible to run an experiment to find out. This is perfectly fine when your team is doing something truly unique, but in most cases thousands of people have done this before you. Surely we can do better than “fail fast” to learn a known thing.

Yes, you need to run experiments to discover what works for you in practice. When you run an experiment you always run the risk of failure, something which you can hopefully learn from. But other people have learned similar things before you, so if you can somehow leverage their learnings you can make better decisions regarding what is likely to work for you. Yes, you will still sometimes fail but you will do so less often. Less failures means you improve faster, and that’s what it’s really all about.

We call this strategy Guided Continuous Improvement (GCI).

 

A Management 3.0 course, making you a manager of a new world qualities

this course qualifies you for a Management 3.0 international certification

Ken Rubin

About Ken Rubin

Managing Principal, Innolution,
LLCAuthor of Essential ScrumCreator of the Visual AGILExicon®
Phone: (303) 827-3333


https://innolution.com/
 

Over the past 10 years Ken has been assisting companies with their larger-scale agile journeys. In several of these companies he has been engaged for multiple years on large (1000+ people) agile efforts. During this presentation he will communicate strategies and actual approaches that have been applied to the real issues he has encountered. The goal of this presentation is to communicate actual lessons learned, not theory.

 

A Hands on DevOps lab, bringing you the top methods and mindset of DevOps

Ken Rubin

About Ken Rubin

Managing Principal, Innolution,
LLCAuthor of Essential ScrumCreator of the Visual AGILExicon®
Phone: (303) 827-3333


https://innolution.com/
 

Over the past 10 years Ken has been assisting companies with their larger-scale agile journeys. In several of these companies he has been engaged for multiple years on large (1000+ people) agile efforts. During this presentation he will communicate strategies and actual approaches that have been applied to the real issues he has encountered. The goal of this presentation is to communicate actual lessons learned, not theory.

 

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